Surgery setup images for Orchiopexy

Orchiopexy-sidetable-setupOrchiopexy-back-table-setup

Mayo stand and back table instruments for Orchiopexy surgery setup

Clamping & Occluding

  • Allis Forceps

    Allis Forceps

  • Curved Hemostat

    Curved Hemostat

  • Mosquito Clamp – Curved

    Mosquito Clamp – Curved

Cutting & Dissecting

  • #3 Knife Handle

    #3 Knife Handle

  • Curved Iris Scissor

    Curved Iris Scissor

  • Metzenbaum Scissor

    Metzenbaum Scissor

  • Stevens Tenotomy Scissor

    Stevens Tenotomy Scissor

  • Straight Mayo Scissor

    Straight Mayo Scissor

Grasping & Holding

  • Adson Forceps

    Adson Forceps

  • Debakey Forcep

    Debakey Forcep

  • Toothed Forcep

    Toothed Forcep

Retracting & Exposing

  • Army-Navy Retractor

    Army-Navy Retractor

  • Freer Elevator

    Freer Elevator

  • Senn Retractor

    Senn Retractor

  • Weitlaner Retractor

    Weitlaner Retractor

Suctioning

  • Ferg-Frazier Suction

    Ferg-Frazier Suction

  • Yankauer Suction

    Yankauer Suction

Suturing & Stapling

  • Mayo-Hegar Needle Holder

    Mayo-Hegar Needle Holder

  • Ryder Needle Holder

    Ryder Needle Holder

What to expect during Orchiopexy

Orchiopexy is a surgical procedure that is performed to treat a condition known as cryptorchidism, which is the failure of one or both testicles to descend into the scrotum. During the procedure, the testicle is located and brought down into the scrotum, and then attached to prevent it from retracting back into the abdomen. Orchiopexy is typically performed in young boys to prevent potential complications such as infertility and testicular cancer that can arise from untreated cryptorchidism.

Positioning
Supine

Drapes
4 folded towels, laparotomy drape

Step 1: Incision and Dissection
During an Orchiopexy, a 15 blade will be used to make an incision on the scrotum or inguinal region, depending on the approach chosen by the surgeon. The surgical technologist should have a 15 blade on hand and ensure that it is sterile before the procedure begins. After making the incision, the surgeon will use a variety of instruments to dissect down to the inguinal ring or other anatomical landmarks that will allow them to locate the testis.

Step 2: Locating the Testis
Once the surgeon has reached the appropriate anatomical location, they will use instruments such as a scalpel or scissors to carefully dissect away any tissues that may be obscuring the testis. The surgical technologist should anticipate the surgeon’s needs and provide them with the necessary instruments as they work.

Step 3: Freeing the Spermatic Cord
After locating the testis, the surgeon will use instruments such as forceps to carefully free the spermatic cord from any torsion or other abnormalities that may be present. The surgical technologist should have a variety of forceps and other instruments on hand to assist the surgeon as needed.

Step 4: Placing Tacking Sutures
Once the spermatic cord has been freed, the surgeon may use tacking sutures to keep the fascia out of the way of the testis. This will allow the testis to have plenty of room to sit comfortably. The surgical technologist should provide the surgeon with the necessary sutures and needles and be prepared to assist with placing the sutures if needed.

Step 5: Controlling Bleeding and Closure
During the procedure, the surgical technologist should be prepared to assist with controlling any bleeding that may occur. This may involve using instruments such as a cautery or hemostats to stop bleeding at the surgical site. Once all bleeding has been stopped, the surgeon will close the incision using sutures or staples. The surgical technologist should be prepared to provide the surgeon with the necessary closure materials and assist with the closure as needed.

The Surgery Sparknotes

  1. Use a 15 blade to make an incision on the scrotum or inguinal region.
  2. Dissect down to the inguinal ring or other anatomical landmarks to locate the testis.
  3. Free the spermatic cord using forceps or other instruments.
  4. Use tacking sutures to keep the fascia out of the way of the testis.
  5. Control bleeding and close the incision using sutures or staples.

4 thoughts on “Orchiopexy

    • Diana Lei-aloha says:

      There usually isn’t a specimen during an orchiopexy since nothing is being removed (unless the doctor runs into some strange tissue or something that looks abnormal, but that is rare). However, there would be a specimen during an orchiectomy when the testicle is being removed. It would be sent to pathology like normal.

  1. Michael Moon says:

    A thoroughly educational post, providing an insightful guide into the detailed steps of orchiopexy! Would love to read a supplementary post addressing the surgeon’s decision-making process in choosing the specific approach (scrotum or inguinal region) for the initial incision, and how varied patient factors might influence this. Great read!

  2. Sandy says:

    Wow, this is a solid breakdown of orchiopexy! Love how you’ve linked each step with the tools needed – so clear and direct. Really neat guide, thanks for sharing!

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